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SPECIAL OLYMPICS, 7 OTHERS, JOIN COMMUNITY HEALTH CHARITIES’ WORKPLACE GIVING CAMPAIGN

SOUTHINGTON, March 29, 2001 – Community Health Charities of Connecticut’s Board of Directors voted at its March 29, 2001 annual meeting to expand its membership to include eight new charities, including Special Olympics Connecticut

The following charities will be joining the workplace giving campaign sponsored by Community Health Charities:

  • ALS Association of Connecticut (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)
  • Cancer Research Institute
  • Connecticut Coalition for Organ & Tissue Donation
  • Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation-Connecticut Chapter
  • Easter Seals Rehabilitation Center of Central Connecticut
  • Myasthenia Gravis Foundation-Connecticut Chapter
  • National Organization for Rare Disorders
  • Special Olympics Connecticut

“Being part of a strong federation like Community Health Charities, that encourages donor choice, will help Special Olympics continue to expand its programs and services to meet the needs of Connecticut’s citizens with mental retardation,” said Beau Doherty, president of Special Olympics Connecticut.

“Workplace campaigns are the most efficient way to raise money.  By joining Community Health Charities’ federation, we will expose thousands of additional potential donors to our work,” Doherty said.

Community Health Charities of Connecticut now will represent the local programs and services of 34 of the state’s most respected health organizations.  Some of these are:  the American Cancer Society, the Alzheimer’s Association, Connecticut Hospice Institute, March of Dimes, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and United Cerebral Palsy.

“This expansion of our reach is in direct response to what we’ve heard from our donors,” said Dean C. Borgman, chair of the board of Community Health Charities of Connecticut.  “Our donors have a wide range of concerns and we want to be sure that our membership reflects those concerns.  This growth will be good for all of Community Health Charities of Connecticut’s members – old and new.”

“Community Health Charities of Connecticut’s’ success has become a model for similar branches nationwide,” Borgman added.  “By adding the new charities to our mix, we not only will increase funding for the specific organizations now under our umbrella, but we also expect the resulting increased visibility will boost the total dollars raised for all our members.”

Community Health Charities of Connecticut raised over $5.7 million in 2000 in support of its members in Connecticut.  The organization also supports companies and their employees year-long with health programs that promote the overall wellness of local residents, through prevention, early detection, treatment, research and support.


COMMUNITY HEALTH CHARITIES OF CONNECTICUT AND
COMMUNITY HEALTH CHARITIES OF SOUTH CENTRAL CONNECTICUT FORM ONE STATEWIDE ORGANIZATION

SOUTHINGTON, March 29, 2001 -- Connecticut’s two leading health-related federations are merging to represent nearly three dozen health charities.

New Haven-based Community Health Charities of South Central Connecticut today announced it is merging with Community Health Charities of Connecticut.  The combined organization will represent 34 nationally-recognized health charities in workplace giving campaigns statewide.

Speaking today at the Annual Meeting of Community Health Charities of Connecticut, Dean C. Borgman, president of Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and chair of Community Health Charities of Connecticut said, “The merged organization will raise more than $5 million annually for disease prevention, treatment, research and for wellness clinics for Connecticut’s residents.”

“The merger will help us continue to increase to number of dollars collected and will help eliminate potential confusion for donors,” Borgman said.  “In addition, the combined organization will help us increase our visibility in the state.  We want more companies to recognize that when they add Community Health Charities to the options given employees for charitable giving, the overall level of giving tends to increase.  That is an important step for a healthier Connecticut.”

“Having a single statewide organization makes good business sense,” said William Ianniello, Sr., chair of Community Health Charities of South Central Connecticut.  “Streamlined operations and increased accessibility for donors means more funding for Connecticut’s health charities and a healthier future for Connecticut’s residents.” 

The combined Community Health Charities of Connecticut will support the local programs and services of 34 of the state’s most respected health organizations, including:  the American Cancer Society, the Alzheimer’s Association, Connecticut Hospice Institute, March of Dimes, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and United Cerebral Palsy. 

“I look forward to working with the people now running Central Connecticut fund raising campaigns,” said Betty Lee Taylor Hagerty, president of Community Health Charities of Connecticut.  “I also look forward to meeting with companies in that region and throughout the state, to explain how everyone benefits when Community Health Charities is added to the mix of options offered for employee charitable contributions.”

Information on how to contribute to Community Health Charities of Connecticut through a workplace giving campaign, or independently, is available from the organization at 1-800-344-6071 or at www.chcct.org

Established in 1965 by Connecticut business leaders, Community Health Charities is a partnership of 34 of Connecticut’s most respected health charities.  Community Health Charities also supports companies and their employees year-long with health programs that promote the overall wellness of local residents, through prevention, early detection, treatment, research and support.


SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY ADDS COMMUNITY HEALTH CHARITIES FOR ANNUAL EMPLOYEE GIVING
TO SUPPORT 24 HEALTH CHARITIES SERVING FAIRFIELD COUNTY

FAIRFIELD, CT, March 1, 2001 -- Employees of Sacred Heart University have a new choice for charitable contributions – Community Health Charities of Connecticut.

Community Health Charities today announced that Sacred Heart University has joined the annual workplace appeal to support 24 health charities that serve Fairfield County.  Those charities include the Brain Injury Association of Connecticut, Epilepsy Foundation of Connecticut and the American Cancer Society.

By adding Community Health Charities to its workplace giving campaign, Sacred Heart University gives its 700 employees an opportunity to support health charities not included in other fund drives.  A total of 24 health charities in Fairfield County rely on Community Health Charities to represent them in workplace campaigns.

Workplace surveys show that employees value choice in making charitable donations. Community Health Charities encourages donors to designate the recipient of their donations.

“Employers throughout the state are recognizing the importance of giving employees more choices,” said Peter H. Roberge, Community Health Charities’ Fairfield County Campaign Chair.  “Employees have more choices than ever before for their medical insurance, retirement benefits and even vacation days.  Giving employees more choice for the charitable contributions is simply an extension of this trend.”

“Research shows that when institutions add new options for employee charitable giving, there tends to be an increase in the overall level of giving,” Mr. Roberge said.

“We are pleased to join the annual Community Health Charities appeal,” said Anthony J. Cernera, Ph.D., President of Sacred Heart University.  “While Sacred Heart University is distinguished by its tradition of service to the community, we are always interested in providing additional opportunities for our employees to support local charities.  The fact that this program is managed through payroll deductions makes it a convenient and appealing option.”

Community Health Charities of Connecticut raised approximately $5 million statewide during its 2000-2001 campaign.  Those funds now are being distributed to the 26 member charities (24 in Fairfield County) that include, among others, The Alzheimer’s Association, American Lung Association Society, Connecticut Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Center and the National Kidney Foundation of Connecticut.
 


CONNECTICUT POST
SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 2001
Opening doors to giving
By DEAN C. BORGMAN

Many companies in Bridgeport and throughout Connecticut have employee giving campaigns.  We are proud to announce that Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and its employees pledged over $1 million in 2000 to its annual Community Giving Campaign.  These funds, distributed among many charities, will help countless individuals and families in Bridgeport and throughout the state.  Many have asked how we made the Sikorsky campaign so successful.

We are convinced that the success of Sikorsky Aircraft’s employee giving campaign is due greatly to the recognition that our employees have a wide range of interests and concerns.  In response to those varied interests, our campaign offers our employees a wide range of charities to which they can donate, including the United Way and Community Health Charities of Connecticut.

Companies offer employees many options these days - job sharing, maternity and paternity leave, health insurance, investment opportunities to name just a few.  It only makes sense to give them options for their giving as well.  This strategy has worked well for Sikorsky and it has been great for our local charitable organizations.

A simple, diverse employee campaign is also one of the most efficient ways to raise money to help your community.  Welcoming a variety of charities to your payroll deduction campaign gives your employees a way to support health and social service charities without having to write additional checks at home.

Nationwide and here in Connecticut, companies are realizing the benefits of diverse campaigns.  When Sears added more charities to its employee giving campaign, total income from the campaign increased by approximately $2 million between 1998 and 1999.

Companies should not be concerned that adding new charities will hurt current participants in their campaigns.  When employees are offered more choices a campaign raises more dollars and more people are helped.  Surveys continue to show that employee giving rises dramatically when wider choices are presented.  In the nationwide Pitney Bowes campaign, for example, United Way income increased by over $100,000 after new charities were added.

American employees are doing well, and many are participating in these workplace charity drives to help those who need it most.  Payroll deduction allows employees to make larger overall contributions, because only a small amount is deducted from each paycheck throughout the year.

If you want to encourage charitable giving at your company and you want to help meet the needs of our community, we urge you to open your doors to new charitable giving options.  Our employees feel good about giving, and those in need in our community are more than a million dollars richer for it.

Dean C. Borgman, President, Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and Chair of the Board of Community Health Charities of Connecticut


Sikorsky President, Dean C. Borgman,
to lead Community Health Charities of Connecticut

STRATFORD…OCTOBER 26, 2000…Dean C. Borgman, President of Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, has been elected chair of the board of Community Health Charities of Connecticut. 

Borgman joined Sikorsky in October 1998 and became President effective July 1, 1999. 

"Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation has supported the work of Community Health Charities of Connecticut and its member health charities in its employee giving campaign for many years" Borgman said.  "These charities have provided essential services to our employees and to society at large.  The Connecticut organization is a model for similar groups around the country and I am proud to be a part of it."

"Our volunteers and member charities are very excited about Dean Borgman coming on board," commented Wayne Hauge, past chair of Community Health Charities of Connecticut.  "Sikorsky has been in the lifesaving business for more than 50 years, and this is a wonderful extension of that corporate mission." 

Founded in 1965 by Connecticut business leaders, Community Health Charities of Connecticut is the state's largest nonprofit health-oriented workplace fundraising federation.  The organization raises more than $5 million annually for 26 of Connecticut's leading nonprofit health charities, including the Alzheimer's Association, the American Cancer Society, the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association and United Cerebral Palsy.

Community Health Charities also serves as a resource to Connecticut companies regarding employee health and providing Lunch & Learn wellness clinics on a variety of health topics.

"We are delighted that Mr. Borgman has accepted this leadership role," said Betty Lee Taylor Hagerty, President of Community Health Charities of Connecticut, "His support for our work is deeply appreciated and I am confident that we will find great new success during his tenure."

The Community Health Charities partnership of Connecticut’s leading health charities provides year-long programs and services to the residents in the Capital Area and throughout Connecticut, including screenings for risk factors;  support groups; financial assistance and information on equipment, medications and treatment; workplace wellness programs and life saving research to find cures.  For more information, visit Community Health Charities of Connecticut at www.chcct.org.

Community Health Charities of Connecticut and
United Way of the Capital Area
Partners Again

HARTFORD…October 5, 2000…Volunteers from Community Health Charities of Connecticut and the United Way of the Capital Area have forged a new partnership aimed at increasing funds raised for over 120 health and human service agencies.

The new agreement unveiled today, calls for the United Way of the Capital Area to help Community Health Charities of Connecticut and raise funds for Connecticut health charities and United Way agencies that are providing services to the Capital Area.  The signing of an agreement ensures the continuation of over 15 years of cooperation between the two organizations in the Capital Area, one of four partnerships between Community Health Charities and other United Ways in Connecticut, which has resulted in this being one of the most successful workplace campaigns in the country.

"This agreement is good for the Capital Area and all of the charities involved," said Wayne Hauge, Chair of the Board of Community Health Charities of Connecticut.  "It serves as a model of how two organizations with different expertise can work together for the common good."

Dean C. Borgman, President of Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and incoming chair of Community Health Charities of Connecticut encouraged partnerships in workplace giving like the one in Hartford throughout the state.  "Overall giving increases when employees are given more choices for their donation, benefiting the participating charities and companies who take pride in a successful campaign" Borgman commented.

The campaign, including both the United Way and Community Health Charities of Connecticut, is currently underway in the Capital Area, involving over 600 companies and thousands of employees.  The goal this year is to raise $25.5 million to support the programs and services provided by the area's nonprofit charities.

Founded in 1965 by the Greater Hartford Chamber of Commerce and Connecticut business leaders, Community Health Charities of Connecticut is the state's largest nonprofit health-oriented workplace fundraising federation.  The organization raises more than $5 million annually to support the local work of 26 of Connecticut's leading nonprofit health charities, including the Alzheimer's Association, the American Cancer Society, the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association and United Cerebral Palsy.

Community Health Charities also serves as a resource to local Connecticut companies regarding employee health and providing Lunch & Learn wellness clinics on a variety of health topics.

The Community Health Charities partnership of Connecticut's leading health charities provides year-long programs and services to the residents in the Capital Area and throughout Connecticut, including screenings for risk factors;  support groups; financial assistance and information on equipment, medications and treatment; workplace wellness programs and life saving research to find cures.  For more information, visit Community Health Charities of Connecticut at www.chcct.org.

 

Southport Business Leader Appointed
Chair of Community Health Charities
Campaign in Western Connecticut

 

Norwalk, CONN. …August 1, 2000…Peter H. Roberge, Vice President at Putnam Trust, Southport, has been named Chair of this year’s Community Health Charities of Connecticut Employee Giving Campaign for Fairfield County and Western Connecticut. The annual campaign runs from September to November.

Announcing the appointment, Community Health Charities of Connecticut President, Betty Lee Taylor Hagerty stated,

“Under Peter’s leadership, I am confident that we will reach this year’s goal of raising $5 million for 26 of Connecticut’s leading health charities.”

Roberge, a long-time member of Community Health Charities’ board of directors, is enthusiastic about his leadership role,

“I am so proud of the vital work of our 26 member charities and I am honored to lead the effort to reach our goal of raising $5 million throughout the state.  This year‘s campaign reflects a growing trend among area businesses to provide employees with options for contributing to the health charities that they value most.”

The Community Health Charities partnership of Connecticut’s leading health charities provides year-long programs and services to the residents of Fairfield County and Western Connecticut, including screenings for risk factors, support groups, financial assistance for equipment, medications and treatment, workplace wellness programs, and life saving research to find cures.

 


 

Northeast Utilities
Chairman, President, & CEO,
Michael Morris
to Chair 2000 Capital Area
Workplace Giving Campaign

 

 

 

 

“Northeast Utilities is committed to improving our Connecticut community and supporting the interests of our employees.  Recognizing their broad concerns, we offer numerous choices in our annual giving campaign, which includes United Way, Earth Share and the Community Health Charities of Connecticut.  This campaign provides great benefits the charities as well as our employees.”


Mohegan Tribe Official to Lead
Community Health Charities
Campaign in Eastern Connecticut

 

 

 

 

UNCASVILLE, CONN. …August 1, 2000…Charles Bunnell, III, Deputy Chief of Staff of the Mohegan Tribe, has been appointed Chair of the 2000 Community Health Charities of Connecticut Employee Giving campaign for Eastern Connecticut.  The campaign runs from September to November.

“Chuck Bunnell is a true champion for the cause of health,” Community Health Charities of Connecticut’s President, Betty Lee Taylor Hagerty, stated.  “I am sure that he will inspire the generosity demonstrated by Mohegan Sun employees throughout Eastern Connecticut and under Chuck’s leadership, I am confident that we will reach this year’s goal of raising more than $5 million for 26 of the state’s leading health charities.”

Bunnell, a member of Community Health Charities’ board of directors, has seen first hand the advantages of including Community Health Charities in employee giving campaigns. In 1999, Mohegan Sun employees contributed nearly $95,400 to Community Health Charities and its 26 participating charities.

“From the initial experience of broadening our campaign to include Community Health Charities, we realized how important it was to mention to employees that they now had another choice in giving.  They could choose the health charities as well as the United Way’s charities” Bunnell commented.  “I believe that donors are very receptive to giving to the trusted health organizations that touch their families and I am looking forward to my role in reaching our goal.

The Community Health Charities partnership of Connecticut’s leading health charities provides year-long programs and services to the residents of eastern Connecticut, including screenings for risk factors, support groups, financial assistance for equipment, medications and treatment, workplace wellness programs, and life saving research to find cures.


Local Celebrities Lend Voices to Community Health Charities

Connecticut…July 1, 2000…Keep an ear out for familiar voices on the radio.

Actress and activist, Susan Saint James and University of Connecticut Women’s Basketball Coach, Geno Auriemma have recently recorded public service announcements for Community Health Charities of Connecticut

The announcements encourage donors to remember Community Health Charities during their companies’ annual giving campaigns or to visit the new website (see page__ for story) at www.chcct.org for more information or to make an on line contribution.  The thirty and sixty second spots are airing on AM and FM radio stations across the state.

Saint James is known for her work in film and on the hit television show “Kate & Ally”.  Auriemma is celebrated for coaching the UCONN Women’s Basketball team to their 2000 Division I NCAA Championship.

Special appreciation is extended to John Berky, General Manager, Connecticut Public Television and Dick Robinson, President, Connecticut School of Broadcasting for donating their facilities and talents to the recording and production of the announcements.

Thank you Susan, Geno and all those who helped make this possible!

 

 

Actress, Susan Saint James

University of Connecticut
Coach, Geno Auriemma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lunch & Learn for the Good Health of Your Employees

Connecticut…July, 2000…In the past year, Millstone Nuclear Power Station in Waterford has provided six Lunch & Learn wellness programs for its employees on skin cancer, asthma, prostate cancer, diabetes, epilepsy and Lyme disease.

Ninety-one men attended a Lunch & Learn session on prostate cancer at Pratt & Whitney in East Hartford.

In Enfield, Phoenix Home Mutual Life provided a Lunch & Learn program entitled “Women and Heart Disease” to sixty employees.  Presented by the American Heart Association and Community Health Charities, the program addressed the unique health risks women face with regard to heart disease.

For a complete listing of available health and wellness topics, contact Susan Zalewa Tupper, RN, Wellness Coordinator, at 800-344-6071.  Lunch & Learn Wellness programs are provided to companies and employees throughout Connecticut free of charge for companies that participate in the campaign or at a modest cost for nonparticipating companies.


 

Leave A Legacy

Connecticut…June, 2000…In Connecticut alone, there are nearly 10,000 nonprofit groups engaged in a wide range of activities: feeding the poor, teaching children and empowering people to repair their lives. And Connecticut residents are generous – each year, 72 percent of our residents contribute to charities. However, only 6 percent leave charitable bequests in their wills.  Why? Most people say they were never asked or didn’t think about it!

Leave A Legacy Connecticut is a statewide public awareness program to promote charitable bequests.  The campaign encourages people to make gifts from their estates to their favorite nonprofit organizations. Financial and estate planners who specialize in this field can help. 

“Everyone can help, regardless of income.  Each gift makes an impact,” says Lyn Walker, co-chair of Leave a Legacy Connecticut and a partner at Day, Berry & Howard of Hartford.

Community Health Charities joins 500 other non-profit agencies throughout Connecticut and thousands across the nation in the Leave A Legacy campaign.  To find out more, visit Leave A Legacy’s web site at www.ctphilanthropy.org/lal

Please consider a bequest through Community Health Charities to any one or more of our 26 health charities.


Community Health Charities Presents
Millennium Award to
Ellsworth S. Grant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HARTFORD, CONN. …April 2000…In celebration of its 35th anniversary, Community Health Charities of Connecticut presented the Millennium Award to the organization’s founder, Ellsworth S. Grant of West Hartford.

Concerned by the confusion and competition caused by numerous workplace solicitations, Grant sought out a way to bring “order out of the chaos” and to establish orderly and efficient charitable giving options.  In 1964, the Greater Hartford Chamber of Commerce agreed to establish a federated health plan for business and industry and in 1965, the Combined Health Appeal was incorporated.  Grant served as the organizations’ first executive director.

The first “Combined Health Appeal” campaign in 1965 raised over $200,000 for seven Connecticut health charities, including the American Cancer Society, the Arthritis Foundation and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.  Community Health Charities of Connecticut now raises over $5 million annually throughout the state for 26 of Connecticut’s most trusted and respected nonprofit health agencies. 

“I am proud and gratified that I had a role in its conception and early growth,“ Grant remarked, “and I am confident that Community Health Charities’ success will continue to grow.” 

In addition to his work with Community Health Charities, Ellsworth S. Grant is a noted civic leader, local historian and philanthropist.  He has served a mayor of West Hartford, chair and trustee of the Connecticut Historical Society and Science Center of Connecticut and was one of the founders of Riverfront Recapture.  Grant is also the author of The Miracle of Connecticut.

Photo Caption: Ellsworth S. Grant, accepts the Millennium Award from Betty Lee Taylor Hagerty, president, and Wayne Hauge of Deloitte & Touche LLP and chair of the board.


Community Health Charities Recognizes
MetroHartford Chamber of Commerce

 HARTFORD, CONN. …MAY 2000…In celebration of its 35th anniversary, Community Health Charities of Connecticut presented the Founder Award to the MetroHartford Chamber of Commerce (MHCC).  Peter Kelly, chairman of Updike, Kelly & Spellacy, P.C. and current chair of the MHCC accepted the award on behalf of the Chamber. 

In 1965, the Chamber established a health focused federated workplace giving plan for business and industry.  Their objectives were to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of workplace health agency fund raising and to increase corporate and employee giving overall.  The Combined Health Appeal (now known as Community Health Charities) resulted from this plan.

The Founder Award was presented at Community Health Charities’ annual meeting, at the Aqua Turf Club in Southington on March 30.  The award was given to recognize and honor the MetroHartford Chamber’s progressive vision back in 1965 and its ongoing support of Community Health Charities’ mission to promote and support health charity programs and services and enhance the health of Connecticut’s residents.

Thirty-five years after its founding, Community Health Charities now raises over $5 million annually for 26 of Connecticut’s most trusted and respected charitable health agencies.

Peter Kelly, Chair of the MetroHartford Chamber of Commerce, accepts the Founder Award on behalf of the MHCC from Betty Lee Taylor Hagerty, president, Community Health Charities of Connecticut and Wayne Hauge of Deloitte & Touche LLP, chair of the board.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Community Health Charities of Connecticut
Accepts Official Statement from Governor

HARTFORD, CONN. …MAY 2000…In celebration of its 35th anniversary, Community Health Charities of Connecticut accepted an Official Statement from Governor John G. Rowland, declaring March 30, 2000, Community Health Charities Day in Connecticut. The organization’s founder, Ellsworth S. Grant and Youth Delegate to the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Children’s Youth Congress, Catherine Eve Agonis presented the honor at Community Health Charities of Connecticut’s annual meeting at the Aqua Turf Club in Southington.

“You’ve made it possible for me to live longer and healthier.” Grant said.  “You’ve made progress in controlling all kinds of illness and my hope is that in this decade you're going to be able to come up with many more breakthroughs.”

Miss Agonis added,

“There are no guarantees in life.  The important thing is that disease should not divide us, but should bring us closer together.”

The Governor’s Official Statement noted Community Health Charities’ efforts to ensure a healthy future for all of Connecticut’s residents by supporting and promoting illness and injury prevention and early detection, treatment, research for cures and wellness programs. Community Health Charities of Connecticut raises over $5 million annually throughout the state for 26 of Connecticut’s most trusted and respected nonprofit health agencies.

In addition to his work with Community Health Charities, Ellsworth S. Grant of West Hartford is a noted civic leader, local historian and philanthropist.  He has served as mayor of West Hartford, Chair and trustee of Connecticut Historical Society and Science Center of Connecticut and was one of the founders of Riverfront Recapture.  Grant is also the author of The Miracle of Connecticut.

Catherine Eve Agonis, age 12 of Greenwich, is a local and national advocate for diabetes research and is the inventor of “Go-Low Alert,” a talking wristwatch that alerts a first responder if a diabetic is in need of medical attention.

Ellsworth S. Grant and Catherine Eve
Agonis accept an Official Statement from
Governor John G. Rowland declaring
March 30, 2000, Community Health
Charities Day in Connecticut.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Catherine Eve Agonis
Delivers Message of Hope

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONNECTICUT…MARCH, 2000…Roller-blading, soccer, movies with friends…all typical pursuits for a 12-year-old.  And in the case of Catherine Eve Agonis, so is public speaking – and a burning desire to find a cure for juvenile diabetes, which affects some thousands of young people as well as Catherine herself.  In March 1998, Catherine was appointed Delegate to Connecticut for the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation.  Her term will proceed through 2001 and during that time this dynamic young person will address various organizations to discuss her disease, as she did at Community Health Charities’ annual meeting on March 30.

“There is a need for a cure for juvenile diabetes and that is why I have made it my mission to spread as much awareness about this disease as I can,” said Catherine.  “It you have a disease of any kind, you can get active in a positive way to make a difference for others as well as yourself.  There are no guarantees that life is going to be perfect and, chances are it isn’t.  The more help we can give each other with life’s imperfections, the better people we become.”

Catherine outlined her daily routine of several blood tests and insulin injections as well as the severe consequences of not taking proper care of herself daily.

“I had the choice of feeling sorry for myself and looking for sympathy or taking care of myself and trying to help others in the process,” she said.  “There are lots of kids in Connecticut with juvenile diabetes or who suffer cystic fibrosis, lupus, asthma, leukemia, retardation and learning disabilities. I’d like to be part of the solution. Wouldn’t you?”

With a sense of humor and maturity beyond her tender years, Catherine joked about answering people’s “ridiculous” questions and about the various celebrities who have expressed interest in helping her find a cure. As she said,

“Suffering in silence will get you nowhere.  But activist or not, having a disease like diabetes has taught me well how to get active in our communities and communicate with others.”

We wish you the very best, Catherine!